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melquiades

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Knox: Athens traffic light photo-enforcement flawed

Maybe that facility is messed up? I happen to have seen the photos that came with the tickets that a couple of family members and associates got from Alps at Broad, and they were all dead on evidence of an infraction

posted @ Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 13:45

Basu: Congress is threat to U.S. national security

I think the key here is we need to compromise: but the emphasis is on 'we' not on 'compromise'. People blame congress (and other elected officials) for being too this and too that, but they VOTE FOR THEM ANYWAY! I am going to pick on the right, for the moment, but concede that the exact same thing happens on the other side. In the Republican primaries, the whole race usually comes down to who can make the biggest, most effective mudslingings about who raised taxes and who voted against our men in uniform. Vitriolic, one-issue, extremes lead nowhere: the people that votes for the clowns that win contest on that basis deserve exactly what they get, rhetoric, not decisions. On the left, any candidate that doesn't howl about any program being cut is knee-jerked right out of the picture.

We are getting what we (collectively) deserve

posted @ Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 13:31

#Ebolanta: Will Atlanta become one of 4 central Ebola treatment centers?

[quote][b]TeeWee[/b] - So now this guy is 'reevaluating' the  position of the CDC.  When will we understand that jumping from crisis to crisis by our federal agencies stems from a lack of leadership and a failure to understand the basic tenements of management. [/quote]

I suspect you meant 'tenets' of management, not:

ten·e·ment
ˈtenəmənt/Submit
noun
1.
a room or a set of rooms forming a separate residence within a house or block of apartments.
2.
a piece of land held by an owner.

In any case, if you think that situations are simple enough that everybody ought to get right to the final story right off the bat, then apparently you don't participate in complex environments very often. Or maybe you prefer leaders that make a decision on Monday and execute it on Wednesday, no matter what happens on Tuesday.

posted @ Tuesday, October 14, 2014 - 11:39

Dallas health worker tests positive for Ebola

I have to say I agree with TeeWee here up to a point: the CDC (nor anyone else) doesn't yet know how the infected worker contracted the disease, they just seem to be saying "We 100% know our protocols must work, therefore if someone got sick they must not have followed them"...While I don't doubt that they have pretty rigorously established that the disease is generally transmitted by very specific body fluid exposure, and that they are also trying to keep hysterical reactions to a minimum (which is a good thing), they just don't know (and may never) exactly what happened in this case.

In my paramedic days, I transported a fellow dying with aids from his folks' house to the hospital (where he died died after). I was so exaggerated in my reaction to all the media hype, I went home, got a different uni and burned the one I was wearing. Later though, I called someone at the CDC and found out a much realer picture of what the actual risks were: while I guess the only real tangible harm was the loss of a brand new uniform (separate from the personal harm of a dying guy and his parents being treated by people who feared he was a terrible contagion), it was an example of just how reactionary we humans can be.

posted @ Monday, October 13, 2014 - 11:04

Iraqi Yazidi girl tells of captivity in IS group

@yeti: I agree with you BUT have to point out: all of these depredations (more ore less, not the 'convert to Islam') are equaled or exceeded by what (in WWII era) the Japanese did in China or the Germans in Russia. The point is that no matter what a story aggregating about the actions of a group (such as IS or the Nazis of the KKK), each individual is continuously responsible for the actions and inherently capable of holding or changing their course for the (far) better or worse. Nathan Bedford Forrest, for example, commonly associated with the KKK, made the following statement in his last public speech, addressed to an organization of black southerners in 1877:

It has always been my motto to elevate every man- to depress none. (Applause.) I want to elevate you to take positions in law offices, in stores, on farms, and wherever you are capable of going.

posted @ Sunday, October 12, 2014 - 05:54

Army War College revokes Sen. John Walsh's degree

"His spokeswoman said he was not available for further comment."

He couldn't have just wiki'd some other politician's caught up in their own shenanigans and issued a compelling statement pasted in from that?

posted @ Saturday, October 11, 2014 - 04:20

Ebola patient arrived at Dallas ER with 103-degree fever

One angle on this story is the apparent double-standard (which my years in health care made me very aware of): so the media is all over a nurse ( very professional, not nearly as well-paid or powerful or enabled to make vital decisions) is blamed for 'withholding' somehow that the man was recently in an Ebola area, while a much more paid-revered-authorized-supported physician somehow had no responsibility to ascertain that. The hospital, like all of them nowadays, undoubtedly saves lots of money by prizing the time of their expensive doctors (which is why you see them for about two minutes at most) and covering you more with less-expensive workers. Just like Abu Ghraib: when the sheet hits the fan, find a foot soldier to take the blame.

posted @ Friday, October 10, 2014 - 16:12

Indiana newlyweds die in apparent murder-suicide

Guns don't kill people. People with guns kill people.

posted @ Friday, October 10, 2014 - 06:42

Report details Alaska brawl that involved Palins

And just think: this could have been in the White House!

posted @ Friday, October 10, 2014 - 06:40

GOP, White House clash on Secret Service scandal

Little congressman sees a chance for advancement

posted @ Friday, October 10, 2014 - 06:36

Obama: US 'underestimated' Islamic State threat

@TeeWee: Nope: no need to blame Bush, except for his mistake in imagining there was ever a benefit to the US in putting substantial American forces in a fighting mode in the chaotic middle east. Now the issue is whether or not the unimpeded growth of forces sponsored by the meanest and dogmatic elements in the islamic middle east is more expensive to us, in political, financial, and ethical currency, than spending some of our super-expensive killing power with some acquiescence by moderate or at least less clearly antagonistic forces in the area. I see that McCain (and perhaps the previous commenters) seem to be arguing that relative permanent expense and exposure of our troops in faraway lands is just 'the right thing to do'....

posted @ Tuesday, September 30, 2014 - 20:00

Nunn hits back at Perdue on terrorism ad

The Republicans keep losing the major fights, though winning the ones people pay less attention to, because they have nothing to suggest in the way of policy, just swift-boating (or whatever they ended up calling the Max Cleland senate candidacy). These things go together though: the R is just a shill for corporate America, which routinely pays lip-service to scared white people, fearful of reality and susceptible to every conspiracy theory they machine can come up with. 20 years of pushing the immigration button, but never doing anything policywise: this is because the people who are pocketing the difference between legitimate domestic labor costs and the government shortfall from undocumented illegal workers are mostly on the right. They can spout about it (and have for 20 years) while marching firmly in place. The solution is trivial: make it a crime to hire an undocumented worker. In 2008, the reduction in employment here drove very large numbers of illegals away.

We have real problems, and can only make progress with them by dealing with truth: anything else is a waste of time.

posted @ Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 15:39

Ferguson video shows witness raising hands in air

@theold33: so you seem to have some definition of fact that is a little slippery: no one has suggested any alternative to the 'fact' that Wilson shot and killed Brown. There's a video, earlier, in which Brown is seeing in the convenience store, roughing up the apparent proprietor. So, I wouldn't quibble with the first statement being a fact, and the second one showing an interaction with Brown clearly doing nothing we'd be proud of in our own flesh-and-blood...but without a longer video, it's not clear much beyond the fact that his actions constituted reasonable cause for a policeman to accost him and apply the procedures appropriate to non-lethal assault, probably other crimes quite possibly including theft.

But you say:

[quote][b]theold33[/b] - was smoking pot, hit Wilson and tried to take his gun and was shot and killed by Wilson.[/quote]

So, unless you have access to information outside the media, then you are just parroting some people's claims and posting them as 'fact' while other ones are just media whatever. So what is your source of what you call facts? Or rather, your standard of evidence for calling them facts?

posted @ Sunday, September 14, 2014 - 13:26

Ferguson video shows witness raising hands in air

@theold33: and you've pretty much exonerated him? I guess you are impyling that if a suspect has a physical alteration with an LEO, then that LEO is entitled to shoot him to death later, even if he's standing with his hands up?

You know, I don't think our legal framework can (or should) stop sensational evidence from appearing in the media, although I think we have a serious problem with the media (for whom sensational evidence is a huge profit-opportunity) having no accountability when due process takes it's course. And it's crazy how, as in the case, the same people who would be inclined to judge for or against a party in these unfinished legal disputes can find wonderful detailed evidence in the media to establish that their inclination is correct. Not the I think the system is perfect, but in the end I trust the legal process, properly regulated to adhere to our guidelines, yields a closer and more dispassionate approximation of the truth that everyone else's (possibly anonymous) opinion

posted @ Sunday, September 14, 2014 - 11:42

Today's editorial cartoon

[quote][b]TeeWee[/b] - The Occupy movement was largely financed by the sections of labor movement  and other wealthy activist to counter the TeaParty movement. [/quote]

Do you have a shred of evidence of that?

posted @ Saturday, September 6, 2014 - 21:28

Isakson chides Nunn for waffling on leadership

@TeeWee: please provide us your perspective on the outside monies to our existing senators and representatives. I agree that outside money is an example of a serious flaw in our political system...I just find using it as a way to single out this candidate is more or less ludicrous

posted @ Wednesday, August 27, 2014 - 21:29

No photos: Parents opt to keep babies off Facebook

The internet is largely funded* by the corporate desire to collect and use information about individuals in order to better exploit people for profit. Literature from earlier in the technology explosion fancied big brother as an evil government effort to spy on us all, which differs from reality only in degree or interpretation. But much more of the data collection is benign, sort of: Target analytics marketed to some pregnant women before they themselves even knew, but just because they wanted to own more of the shower registry market,

So, it's not exactly driven by evil: even the NSA just thinks its getting ahead of terrorists. But whatever the motivations NOW, humans have a way of morphing things (recall how the road to hell is paved). So, don't get on the internet if you expect that no one will know what you are up to...

*The physical internet is directly funded by the consumer and the government: I am referring to the sites and processes that together make what we call the internet

posted @ Sunday, August 24, 2014 - 09:32

Obama taking less vacation, but too much for some

@TeeWee: Like all of his predecessor's that I know anything about, photographs of this president clearly show the strain of the job: he's grey and gaunt.

So, if you want to contrast the statement that you have to give your life to it with the fact that he plays golf and relocates away from the White House about the same as all the others (although less than his predecessor) as an example of a broken promise,then go ahead. But it's saying more about you than about him.

I voted for Obama both times, and absolutely still believe that he was the better choice both times. But I don't think he's been particularly good. On the other hand, the relentless, ludicrous tripe that the right and its Fox propaganda corporate shill fill the airways sends me a clear message:

they really don't have a lot of real traction

We would be better off with a responsible opposition, but there's darned little of it.

posted @ Saturday, August 23, 2014 - 09:22

'Do-nothing Senate' is problem in Washington, Collins says

This perspective would carry more weight if someone looking for the broader background on the interaction between houses this year wouldn't be slapped hard by way the BIGGEST imbroglio between the two: the R-House refusing to fund the government for weeks, then giving up on their symbolic and destructive gesture, causing huge political backlash against the philosophy and individuals responsible. The word stupid comes to mind...

posted @ Saturday, August 16, 2014 - 12:00

Most Georgia school systems might soon take charter route

Unfortunately, I do not see this as being much more than about power: for those who disagree with the current federal philosophy, push for state power. For those who disagree with their state's political bent, push for local control. For those who feel outnumbered in their district, push for direct parental control.

I believe we are at a major turning point in our whole educational system: too me, the biggest issue, as I repeat ad nauseam here, is that automation and transportation/communications technologies have made workers into a commodity with little value. Why should society spend billions educating people to work at WalMart, follow directions from Bentonville about when to feature the red sweaters vs when to make a dogfood extravaganza. Centralized decision-making requires automata to stand in front of the consumer and explain that's just the way it is?

I think there IS an answer to that question: maybe the role of education is not to train workers, it's to train citizens. Life is about more than your job: open minds, exposed to the many avenues of understanding about just what you can tolerate and what you must act on for other people's actions, how to accept yourself and others: these are what have been kicked all over the field in our extremist political farce.

posted @ Sunday, August 10, 2014 - 08:52

Carey Pollett: Tough EMS veteran with a tender heart

@skydog: So did I, and double ditto.

posted @ Sunday, August 10, 2014 - 08:35

2nd American aid worker with Ebola arrives in Georgia

@TeeWee: While I agree with the general point, I must say (with many years as a member of and also spouse of health care professional) that there is some logic to the phenomenon...and it's not for a good reason. The US was (thing are changing) the capital magnet and was very supportive of technology research, So big dollars have stimulated lots of technology gains (although we are also a bit ethnocentric and just kind of assume that everything new started here (www: no, radar: no computers: no nuclear science: no). But there's a distinct flip side: if you are the Shah of Iran with a rare cancer, head for the US. If you are an ordinary person having a baby, US is about 35th on the list...profiteering has come to dominate the health care industry just as much as most others. Expensive technologies command a lot of power with the insurance companies, they cut great deals, but the cost (and effectiveness) of everyday/manpower oriented medicine has dropped off

posted @ Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 20:40

Kingston is best choice for Senate

@cyou299: I don't find many successful businessmen turned political leader, and for me it's because the management prerogatives are practically diametrically opposed: in business, the idea is to turn a profit, even if it means switching to a totally different product: when dial-up modems went away, many of those companies made the transition to something rather different, in some cases rather successfully. In government, by contrast, the needs of the population being served dictate what has to be provided: it would never be possible to say "we just lose money stopping murderers. let's put all effort into tax evasion"

posted @ Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 13:02

Candidate scraps shotgun-blast ad against Congress

Well, I certainly agree that the ad crosses the line, and that my fellow liberals would probably have chastised a Republican who did the same thing. So, I guess here's to the right of all Americans to be stupid and still run for office. I am more uncomfortable with the fact that a person can be this lame in their thinking and still have a gun, but I guess the line would have to go somewhere, and if only people that never ever did anything stupid was the law, the gun companies really would go out of business.

posted @ Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 09:06

Security Council urges Gaza truce; no sign of lull

Wonder why the media has consistently made no reports at all about the level of damage from the "nearly 700 rockets and mortars" fired from Gaza into Israel. I can't imagine that the information hasn't been collected locally.

posted @ Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 08:52

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